Category: Entertainment

Selena Gomez Dropped A New Song & It Sounds Very Familiar

Selena Gomez is an executive producer on Netflix's 13 Reasons Why, an upcoming series based on Jay Asher's YA novel. But it looks like she's doing even more for the show than we thought — Gomez just teased a song of her own from the 13 Reasons Why soundtrack.It looks like Gomez is covering Yaz's (or should we say, Yazoo's) "Only You" for the series. She shared a 30-second clip of the cover on Twitter."2 days til @13ReasonsWhy… Here's a 1st listen to my cover of "Only You" from the soundtrack, inspired by Hannah and Clay's story. Out 3/30!" Gomez captioned the clip.Gomez's "Only You" is much more somber than the boppy '80s version you remember. (And if this song sounds familiar to non-'80s babies out there, it's also Henry's music of choice in Once Upon a Time.)The tempo change makes sense, given how serious 13 Reasons Why 's story is. The book, and now the Netflix series, are about a high school student who died by suicide and left cassette tapes for her classmates.The cover definitely falls into the stereotype of slowed-down cover songs created for trailers. But since the show's subject matter is so dark, we'll give it a pass.2 days til @13ReasonsWhy… Here's a 1st listen to my cover of "Only You” from the soundtrack, inspired by Hannah and Clay's story. Out 3/30! pic.twitter.com/aSrAFhpFoY— Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) March 29, 2017 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js13 Reasons Why will hit Netflix this week. It stars Katherine Langford and Dylan Minnette as Hannah and Clay. Grey's Anatomy and Private Practice star Kate Walsh will also star in the series, as Hannah's grieving mother.It looks like Gomez will have a bigger role than we thought in the show, even though she's not starring in it. We can't wait to see how she and Netflix tell Asher's story  — and to hear the full version of the song.If you or someone you know is considering self-harm, please get help. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?How Julia Michaels Is Taking Over The Music IndustryThe Saddest Breakup Songs Of All TimeThe 20 Best Music Blogs That Aren't Pitchfork

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The Harlots Premiere Quotes You Need To Read To Believe

Harlots arrives today on Hulu to bring all the varied shades of female sexuality to television. The British drama follows an 18th century mother named Margaret Wells (Samantha Morton), who also happens to be a brothel owner. In “Episode 1,” Margaret makes the difficult decision to auction off her youngest daughter Lucy’s virginity to the highest bidder.Margaret’s choice for Lucy (Eloise Smyth) is dark and disturbing, but in the matriarch’s mind it’s the only way to advance her family’s financial and social standing. As Margaret and Lucy deal with that moral quandary, the oldest Wells sister Charlotte (Jessica Brown Findlay) considers signing what’s essentially an ownership contract from her wealthy and whiny benefactor, Sir George (Hugh Skinner).Although the Harlots pilots has all the depth and lush beauty of premium Emmy bait like Outlander or The Tudors, it also has something they’re missing. The Hulu newbie hides a crackling wit underneath the serious surface. When they’re not dealing with the real-life dangers of sex work, the characters of Harlots say some truly absurd and unexpected things in “Episode 1.” Take a look at the slideshow to see what we mean.“You are the pineapple of Great Britain,” — Sir George to Charlotte.Never use this on Tinder.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“How can I relinquish my freedom to a man who thinks I’m a pineapple?” — Charlotte.I ask myself the same thing every day.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“I’m the Duchess of Quim,” — Emily (Holli Dempsey).“Quim,” for those unfamiliar with 18th century slang, means vagina.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“I am sunk in lust and lechery. What is the cost of my soul?” — man to Betsey Fletcher (Alexa Davies).“Five shillings.”Souls have a very specific and shrewd price.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“I want your forgiveness.” — man to Betsey Fletcher after leaving her to die.“Eight shillings.”The price of souls only goes up when you’re a coward.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“I won’t harm you, look!” — Charles (Douggie McMeekin) to Emily, while pulling out an old-timey condom.Harlots deserves your viewership if only for its use of old-timey condoms.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“The lieutenant would cherish a voyage on your peaks,” — Margaret Wells to Fanny Lambert (Bronwyn James).There’s nothing the women of Harlots enjoy more than good innuendo.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“Sweet Emily, why don’t you just cluck off?” — Kitty Carter (Lottie Tolhurst) to Emily.The only thing these ladies prefer is a fun pun.Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.“Nothing comes for free, sir.” — Daniel Marney (Rory Fleck Byrne) to Charlotte.“You would, I guarantee it.”See what I mean?Photo: Liam Daniel/Hulu.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?Unfortunately, Harlots Is Still Accurate About Sex WorkThe Mindy Project's Sixth Season Will Be Its LastOur Favorite Crime Shows Of All Time

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This Beyoncé & Lady Gaga Songwriter May Be The Most Political Artist In The Age Of Trump

Everyone you love wants Father John Misty, or as his birth certificate reads, Josh Tillman, to work with them. Beyoncé picked some his lyrics to complete “Hold Up,” arguably the best song on Lemonade (okay, but top five for sure). Lady Gaga asked him to write with her, and out came “Come to Mama.” Lana Del Rey put him in her video for “Freak,” a song inspired by their friendship. Even Stranger Things allegedly wanted him in the cast of the second season. So what’s the appeal?[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jq30l5-vBbo]It’s his poetry. The guy writes some undeniably attention-grabbing songs. Like that one he performed on Saturday Night Live that talked about having virtual reality sex with Taylor Swift. It wasn’t a burn, it was a commentary on the public’s access to famous people in a heightened technological state (and, as Tillman explains, Swift rhymes so nicely with Oculus Rift).In the age of President Trump, Father John Misty is about to deliver an album called Pure Comedy that is one you need to listen to if you're unhappy with the state of the nation. It attacks the uninformed citizenry immobilized by religion and prescription drugs while mocking hipsters and hypocrites on the left, all through the lens of his sardonic sense of humor that he calls petulance. While Trump, and in fact no public figure other than Swift (and Amy Grant, but that’s another thing entirely), merits a mention in his lyrics, they are pointedly aimed at our culture. For example, “Ballad of the Dying Man,” which satirizes the often overstated point of view of any one of the white males who offer endless commentary of cable news or engage in the never-ending battles of social media warriors. It’s one of those songs that makes you laugh because it’s true and then sigh...because it’s true.What’s intriguing about his songs is that musically, they’re so familiar. There are elements of blue-eyed soul in his vocals that can be traced to their origination in the halls of Stax and Motown Records. The songs have elements of folk guitar and structuring, overlaid with modern production giving some of them just that hint of electronic that doesn’t verge into EDM territory. It is when they are paired with his lyrics, which are equal parts jocular and dour, that they take on the veneer of monologues by John Oliver or Samantha Bee. His book full of burns how the system, humanity, religion, the patriarchy, and civilization are failing us are unflinching and punctuated with enough wry humor to make you hear the truth underlying the joke about how the world is falling apart.[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVaafph6HSQ]Outside of this album, his stance on pop music caught my attention. Naturally, after one writes for Bey, every music site on the internet will want to ask questions about it. His response to Jillian Mapes in a Pitchfork interview, when asked about his experience writing with these women who dominate the landscape, was shocking.“If you think that pop stars are anything other than prisoners, then you are fucking kidding yourself,” he said. “…why do you think that Lady Gaga or Beyoncé would come to old Uncle Jerry over here for songs if they weren’t looking for something? If they weren’t like, ‘Get me away from these fucking psychos.’ Both of them know I’m not running around looking for these gigs.”He then turned around and told the New York Times that the pop music industry “is categorically anti-woman. I know a lot of women in that industry. They were pitched an American narrative about success equaling freedom when there couldn’t be anything further from the truth.”That’s a pretty big coffee mug of what the actual fuck to be serving up, especially considering that Tillman’s debut album as Father John Misty was an outrageous and sometimes misogynistic take on the male psyche in love. But he’s not wrong about how pop music treats its female artists. Put into perspective, I recently read the memoirs of one of the giants of the music industry, Clive Davis (he’s the guy who oversaw the careers of Whitney Houston, Patti Smith, Alicia Keys, and royally pissed off Kelly Clarkson). At the end of his book, Davis reveals that he is bi-sexual and for the last 20 years, after two marriages to women, he has been in relationships with men. If you think he’s an ally, though, let me assure you: he was not. Through his tenure as the head of Columbia Records, Arista Records, and J Records he signed hundreds of artists. He never mentions taking the consideration of how men look into account, but his assessment the looks of every female artist he works with are an important part of the marketing and imaging plan around them. That never changes in how he writes about artists, from the 1960s to the 2000s. It’s irritating as fuck.That’s just how it is, all the time. Seriously. It’s not something Max Martin or Diplo are ever going to acknowledge in a conversation about the women they work with because they probably don’t notice — or don’t care, they’re getting paid either way. We live in a world where a radio DJ felt he could stick his hand up Taylor Swift’s skirt during a meet and greet. Fortunately, we also live in a world where Swift sued him for doing it.Is Tillman an ally to talk about the grinding meat machine that is the pop music industrial complex? Not exactly, but it feels like a relief that he didn’t just answer the question by saying that Beyoncé is an ethereal goddess of creativity and he was #blessed to be in her presence.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?Quavo Actually Isn't The Beyoncé Of MigosThe Sexiest Songs Of All TimeHere's Why Adele May Never Tour Again

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Listen To The Serial Team's New Podcast Before Someone Spoils It For You

It’s rare that I want my long morning commute to last even longer. But this morning, when the conductor announced train delays, I grinned. A couple more minutes on the platform meant a couple more minutes listening to S-Town, the latest true-crime podcast from NPR and the creators of Serial, released this morning.The label “true crime” isn’t quite right for S-Town, though. I’d go with “Southern gothic.”Sure, host Brian Reed ostensibly travels to Bibb County, Alabama, to investigate the alleged murder of a teenager, systematically covered up by members of the rural town. But with its cinematic sense of place, a charismatic character at the podcast’s center, and unabashed use of metaphor (see: hedge mazes with no exits), S-Town is unlike any other true-crime podcast I’ve encountered — Serial and beyond.The podcast begins with a phone call. John Macklemore — the owner of a deep Southern twang, skeptical personality, and curious mind — knows there’s something amiss in his Alabama town, which he calls “Shit Town.”A longtime listener of This American Life, John’s reached out to NPR as a last resort. Like a modern-day Cassandra, only John is concerned with the police corruption, unexplained murders, and socioeconomic decay all around hm. With a tendency toward the dramatic, John likens his impoverished town in western Alabama to Fallujah, Darfur, and Beirut. He speaks with a wry, over-the-top cadence, like he’s spent a life running circles around people and is desperate for someone on his level.When, at last, John thinks Reed is understanding, he exhales happily, “You’re beginning to figure it out now, aren’t you?” Now, John has an audience beyond his only confidant, the town lawyer who’s smart enough to live in Tuscaloosa.Perhaps it’s John himself, not John’s story, that convinces Brian Reed to fly to Alabama and investigate the murder. After all, it’s John’s off-the-cuff storytelling that kept me poised on the edge of my seat.“By sheer force of will, John was opening a portal between us,” Reed says of their hours-long conversations. And that portal leads to John’s world, a small town in Alabama that’s something straight out of Faulkner.So, like any NPR producer who sniffs a story, Reed goes to Alabama. He goes to John’s house, which is only navigable by coordinates, not street names. John’s house has the only hedge maze in Alabama, an old clock repair shop, and about a million bustling projects fueled by his pent-up mental energy. At once, John's the Matilda whose intelligence was never acknowledged by Miss Honey; he’s the old woman in the mansion on the hill, the conspiracy theorist who sees a reality everyone around him is blind to. And he’s entrancing.But is he reliable? And are his stories, and accusations, true?As Reed investigates the murder, he’s also peeling back layers of the caller at the heart of the story. One of S-Town ’s big questions is, of course, who killed Dylan Nichols? But the other is, will John ever get out of his shit town, where he’s as entrenched as the trees and the tattoo parlors and the WalMarts?All six episodes of S-Town are now available to stream. So, in a few hours, the floodgates of spoilers will be open unto the internet. This is our official recommendation to listen now, before someone gets to the end.Read These Stories Next:The Viral Words You Need To KnowSick Of TV? These Shows Will Get You Addicted All Over AgainThe True Story Behind This Scary MemeLike what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?David Beckham Is Almost Unrecognizable In His Upcoming Movie Role Peta Murgatroyd Showed Fans The Reality Of Being A Working New MomChrissy Teigen's Response To Fox News Tagging Her In A Tweet Is Golden

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