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Jeff Bezos donates $33 million to educate Dreamers in honor of his immigrant father

  • Jeff Bezos donated $33 million to provide college scholarships to illegal immigrants brought to the US as children by their parents, known as ‘Dreamers.’
  • Bezos has been vocal in pressuring the Trump administration and Congress to bring back protections to Dreamers.
  • Bezos made the donation in honor of his father, who fled Cuba to the US alone when he was 15, went to college in the US, and lived the American dream, including raising the boy who would found Amazon and become the richest man in the world.

As members of Congress duke it out over if and how they will solve the situation of 800,000 illegal immigrants brought to the US as children –  the world’s richest man has stepped in with a strong message.

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos and his wife, MacKenzie, are donating $33 million to Thedream.us, an organization that helps Dreamers pay for a college education.

The money will fund the education of 1,000 Dreamers, if they have graduated from high school and they are part of the The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA is a program that began under former President Barack Obama that allowed Dreamers to obtain school visas, get jobs, pay taxes, and so on.

19 PHOTOS

Faces of those impacted by Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

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Paulina, 26, a DACA recipient, is comforted after watching U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ announcement on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on a projection screen at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) headquarters in Los Angeles, California, U.S., September 5, 2017. Paulina, a graduate of UCLA, arrived in the U.S. when she was 6 years old. She said the decision was really upsetting but she was going to continue to work to push members of Congress to enact a law to protect their rights. “We are not going to give up”, she said. REUTERS/Monica Almeida

Young DACA recipients, Mario, Melanie and Luis, watch U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ announcement on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, on a projection screen at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) headquarters in Los Angeles, California, U.S., September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Monica Almeida

Jorge-Mario Cabrera, CHIRLA spokesman and Communications Director (R), along with staff and young DACA recipients watches U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ announcement on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, on a projection screen at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) headquarters in Los Angeles, California, U.S., September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Monica Almeida

NEW YORK, NY – FEBRUARY 18: A family fills out an application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), at a workshop on February 18, 2015 in New York City. The immigrant advocacy group Make the Road New York holds weekly workshops to help immigrants get legal status under DACA to work in the United States. An expansion of the national program, scheduled for this week, was frozen by a ruling from a Texas federal judge. The Obama Administration plans to appeal the ruling and, if sussessful, DACA would allow legalization of up to two million immigrants who entered the United States before they were age 16. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: People attend an orientation class in filing up their application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: Mitzi Pena, 19, (R) her sister Yaretzi Pena, 5, and her cousin Karina Terriquez, 20, (L) wait in line to receive assitance in filing up their application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: People attend an orientation class in filing up their application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Edgar Lopez shows his Employment Authorization Card, at home in Davenport, Florida, February 1, 2013. Edgar and his brother Javier are among the 1.7 million estimated illegal immigrants younger than 30 who were brought to the U.S. as children and are eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. (Ricardo Ramirez Buxeda/Orlando Sentinel/MCT via Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: Oscar Barrera Gonzalez along with a group of immigrants, known as DREAMers, hold flowers as they listen to a news conference to kick off a new program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: Roberto Larios, 21, (R) holds Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival application as he waits in line with hundreds of fellow undocumanted immigrants at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles offices to apply for deportation reprieve on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: Brenda Robles, 20, (R) holds her high school diploma as she waits in line with her friends at at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles offices to apply for deportation reprieve on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – AUGUST 15: Hundreds of people line up around the block from the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles offices to apply for deportation reprieve on August 15, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Under a new program established by the Obama administration undocumented youth who qualify for the program, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, can file applications from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website to avoid deportation and obtain the right to work (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Undocumented UCLA students Alejandra Gutierrez (L) and Miriam Gonzales attend a workshop for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in Los Angeles, California, August 15, 2012. President Barack Obama’s administration announced on June 15 it would relax U.S. deportation rules so that many young illegal immigrants who came to the United States as children can stay in the country and work. The changes went into effect on Wednesday. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES – Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)

Alan Valdivia receives assistance in filling out paperwork for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California, August 15, 2012. The U.S. government began accepting applications on Wednesday from young illegal immigrants seeking temporary legal status under relaxed deportation rules announced by the Obama administration in June. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES – Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)

People fill out paperwork for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California, August 15, 2012. The U.S. government began accepting applications on Wednesday from young illegal immigrants seeking temporary legal status under relaxed deportation rules announced by the Obama administration in June.REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES – Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)

Students wait in line for assistance with paperwork for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California, August 15, 2012. The U.S. government began accepting applications on Wednesday from young illegal immigrants seeking temporary legal status under relaxed deportation rules announced by the Obama administration in June. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES – Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)

Undocumented UCLA students prepare paperwork for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in Los Angeles, California, August 15, 2012. President Barack Obama’s administration announced on June 15 it would relax U.S. deportation rules so that many young illegal immigrants who came to the United States as children can stay in the country and work. The changes went into effect on Wednesday. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES – Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)

Paulina, 26, a DACA recipient during U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ announcement on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, on a projection screen at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) headquarters in Los Angeles, California, U.S., September 5, 2017. Paulina, a graduate of UCLA, arrived in the U.S. when she was 6 years old. She said the decision was really upsetting but she was going to continue to work to push members of Congress to enact a law to protect their rights. “We are not going to give up”, she said. REUTERS/Monica Almeida

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But the DACA program didn’t solve the underlying problem: Dreamers still live in a legal gray zone. So traditional forms of paying for college, like government grants and students loans, were often unavailable to them.

Bezos made the donation in honor of his father, Mike Bezos, who fled Cuba alone when he was 15. Mike eventually worked his way through the University of Albuquerque and then went on to work at Exxon as a petroleum engineer before meeting Jeff’s mom, Jackie, the daughter of a high-level Atomic Energy Commission official. 

“My dad came to the U.S. when he was 16 as part of Operation Pedro Pan,” said Jeff Bezos in a statement explaining the donation. “He landed in this country alone and unable to speak English. With a lot of grit and determination – and the help of some remarkable organizations in Delaware – my dad became an outstanding citizen, and he continues to give back to the country that he feels blessed him in so many ways. MacKenzie and I are honored to be able to help today’s Dreamers by funding these scholarships.”

Bezos’ parents founded the Bezos Family Foundation, a philanthropy organization focused on charitable giving to education.

President Donald Trump ended the DACA program and gave Congress until March to pass a law permanently fixing it. But Congress has been deadlocked on the issue, with Republicans insisting that the law would have to include a provision to build a massive wall on the Southern border with Mexico. Democrats oppose the wall and the billions of dollars of US taxpayer money that would be spent on it.

Bezos, who overtook Bill Gates in October to reign as the world’s richest man, has been openly urging President Trump to authorize DACA again. He was one of 400 executives who signed an open letter in September to Trump and he was one of over 100 executives who signed another letter earlier this week urging Congress to pass the bill before the deadline.

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

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SEE ALSO: Ginni Rometty, Tim Cook, Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos and other tech CEOs warn of ‘significant costs’ and ‘disruptions’ if Congress doesn’t save the Dreamers by January 19

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