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Love Letter: Making Room for More Love (and Sheep)

Living in a picturesque farmhouse on many acres of land may sound like a dream to some. But many couples who live and work on fully functioning farms know it’s anything but glamorous. Tending to the day-to-day demands of a farm, including caring for several different animals, can take a toll on any relationship. In this week’s Modern Love essay, Bethany Groff Dorau, a writer who grew up on a farm, questions whether her city slicker husband is cut out for the rural life. Then they decide to adopt three sheep.

In the five decades since the legalization of interracial marriage in the United States, many interracial couples, including Renee Knake and Wallace B. Jefferson, thank Mildred Loving and Richard Loving, who effectively challenged interracial marriage laws in the 1960s.

Ms. Knake and Mr. Jefferson were married July 4 outside of the Michigan governor’s summer residence on Mackinac Island, Mich., where they paid homage to the Lovings during their ceremony by sharing statements dedicated to their fight for interracial marriage. “I can’t imagine what it would be like to be so profoundly and deeply in love as I am with this man and to have to feel like I was committing a crime,” Ms. Knake said.

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And, if you’re thinking about checking in on a friend or family member who is going through a difficult time right now, here’s how to create the right atmosphere so your loved ones feel comfortable opening up, even if you’re not able to connect in person.

We want to deliver content that truly matters to you and your feedback is helpful. Email your thoughts to loveletter@nytimes.com.

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